Posts Tagged ‘leadership development’

Is your ERG measurably effective?

October 13, 2010

This is a follow up to the blog posted earlier in the week on the evolution of Business Resource Groups (ERGs or BRGs).  They migrate along a recognizable path from an Informal Affinity Group, to a Formal (but still inward-looking) Affinity Group, to an Employee Resource Group (with clear support and resources from the corporation) to the highest level of contribution to the firm, the Resource Business Group.

Business Resource Groups (BRGs) differ from Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) because they have explicit goals which are tied directly to objectives of the business.  Thus, the BRG will have goals for recruiting and business development – which are monitored and regularly reported.

Two partners from Deloitte’s Atlanta office gave a presentation on metrics for evaluating the maturity and effectiveness of ERGs/BRGs.

The full text of this blog has moved to http://www.mentorresources.com/blog/bid/101113/Is-your-ERG-measurably-effective

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Mentorship vs. Sponsorship

September 22, 2010

This month’s Harvard Business Review has an article Why Men Still Get More Promotions Than Women which prompted us to reflect on the pyramid of women in American business. Women represent over half of all managers at fifty-one percent, yet less than fourteen percent of executive officers in Fortune 500 companies are women.

Herminia Ibarra (from INSEAD) and Nancy Carter and Christine Silva (both of Catalyst) believe there is a difference between Mentors and Sponsors.

Mentors were expected to provide psychosocial and career support. Most mentors focus on personal and professional development.

Sponsorship, by contrast, involves advocating for advancement. Without sponsorship, a person is less likely to be promoted, even if they are high-potential. Research by Kathy Kram suggests that someone is likely to be overlooked for promotion regardless of his or her competence and performance. This is especially true for managers at mid-career and beyond.

Mentors and Sponsors: How They Differ

Mentors

  • Can sit at any level in the hierarchy
  • Provide emotional support, feedback on how to improve and other advice
  • Focus on mentee’s personal and professional development
  • Help mentees learn to navigate corporate politics
  • Serve as role models

Sponsors

  • Must be senior managers with influence
  • Give proteges exposure to other executives who may help their careers
  • Make sure their people are considered for promising opportunities and challenging assignments
  • Protect their sponsorees from negative publicity or damaging contact with senior executives
  • Fight to get their people promoted

The article ended on a positive note: Women in formal mentoring programs were more likely to win promotions than those who had found their own mentors.

So, while firms are only beginning to have clear sponsorship expectations from mentors in their high-potential programs, some sponsorship was occurring. In one example cited, IBM Europe has a clearly defined sponsorship program for senior women below the executive level. Sponsors are expected to get their candidates ready to for the next level within a year. Failure to obtain a promotion is viewed as a failure of the sponsor, not of the candidate.

We would like to talk to you about how WisdomShare™ can help you achieve your firm’s mentoring or sponsorship goals.

Kim Wise  &  Elizabeth Pearce